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All comments by Wayne Burrows
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One can see the markings. They are clearly marked. I personally haven't looked carefully enough at the backs to decide the markings but each card appears to haves a different back design.
Feb. 9
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No the cards have clearly printed marked backs.
Feb. 9
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No putting players into a bracket because they asked to play up is ad hoc
Feb. 9
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I don't think you should comment that you are going to play him for a good play.

I also can't believe the brackets are decided in an ad hoc fashion.
Feb. 8
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Doesn't the question and answer depend on the definition of good?
Feb. 6
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That is a good point David B. 4 took up some space. Maybe the opener is bidding 5 reluctantly.

If partner doubles 5 will you now bid 5 or do you ride it out?
Feb. 6
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The problem at the table occurred from the other side. A poll when this player passed revealed that double clear. That led me to think what would this hand do after this hand passed and partner doubled. However I suspected that many would not pass this hand so I wanted to get a feel for how many would pass this hand on this round.
Feb. 5
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A significant minority in the poll are passing and the player at the table passed. You might need to ask them.
Feb. 5
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Three cards in a major might not be enough. Say it is spades. Then you may need hearts and possibly spades to break to come to 11 tricks when you are a favourite for a spade and two heart tricks on defence.
Feb. 4
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As far as I am aware there was no such agreement. If there was it was not mentioned.
Feb. 4
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There is also a statement that 3 was not alerted as a weak raise. Sorry i was not explicit. The presumption was that it should have been.
Jan. 30
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“A weak jump raise does need an alert …” means that it is alertable.
Jan. 29
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I think that most play weak jump raises in competition. There are some partnerships that play invitational jump raises though.
Jan. 29
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It takes two bites out of the same apple if they could have protected themselves but chose not to.

EW are internationals in a regular partnership. NS are experience but not in a regular partnership.
Jan. 29
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You might overcome a 3=1 heart distribution with other favourable layouts as two hearts can be pitched on the diamonds.
Jan. 29
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I don't think it transmits any useful information.

The question could be because he would have bid a competitive 4C hoping to buy the contract opposite a weak bid but wants to make an advanced sacrifice now or it could be because he has this sort of good hand. West will not know which.
Jan. 29
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The New Zealand regulations list as an exception to “Natural calls as defined above in general do not require an alert, but there are important exceptions.”

“A jump raise of opener’s 1-level bid, which may be weak or pre-emptive.”

The regulation is silent as to whether or not this applies in competition.
Jan. 29
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no
Jan. 27
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My partner and I played forcing pass the first time I played in the New Zealand Interprovincial Championships in around 1990-1. We gave up because it was too much effort playing two systems. Or rather maintaining the forcing pass just for the events in which it was allowed to be played.

Forcing pass is still allowed in New Zealand but only in Open level events where you play eight or more boards against the same opponents. Possibly HUM systems also need to be advised in advance of the event. I am not sure of the precise regulation.

At world championships these methods have been excluded from round robin so players who want to play them have to be prepared to play two systems and be on a team good enough to qualify for the knockout rounds. No one actually plays them at that level as best I can tell.
Jan. 24
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Before there were system regulations presumably.
Jan. 23
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