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All comments by Wesley Chen
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I dont think going to game is normal or expected on these cards.
Feb. 18, 2014
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agreed;
also I think a likely secondary implication is very good clubs sitting over declarer. probably either long diamonds as well, or long/short hearts
Feb. 3, 2014
Wesley Chen edited this comment Feb. 3, 2014
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exactly, well said
April 4, 2013
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Dude you must be 13, at least in the mind.
EVERYONE says you were being offensive, and your smart comeback is, essentially,

“I never said I was being offensive”

April 4, 2013
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What about the anti thesis to this?
The book by Mike Lawrence and Anders Wirgren?
“I fought the LoTT”
March 20, 2013
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why tell opponents all about your stoppers or lack of it, anyway?
Aug. 15, 2012
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most of the discussion above seems to conclude that as long as someone takes a long time (say, 2 minutes) to recall an artificial bid, then their result will be adjusted if they get to the optimal contract and make it. Doesn't seem very fair to the offenders.

May 9, 2012
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Eugene
Roger's style of Puppet Stayman does not stop West from reasoning that his partner has 5+ hearts.
May 3, 2012
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The problem might not be educational programmes… those will follow if bridge is popular among youths. If it does not catch on, then all the free lessons and coaching in the world won't help at all.

I think Mr Moese is spot on with the “cool and fun comes first” point.

Bridge is not visually entertaining, it is not prominent on facebook/twitter/TV (not prominent, period), and its celebrities are not influential (casual players don't even know who or what is Meckwell, or Blue Team); something needs to change about these first.

Mr Levy: Please refer to the link, From The Well: Adam Kaplan's Perspective, and all the relevant comments, so you don't have to look elsewhere for feedback.

http://bridgewinners.com/article/view/from-the-well-adam-kaplans-perspective/
March 28, 2012
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I'm 20 years old, and i believe Adam's opinions reflect the sentiments (frustration?) of many enthusiastic juniors around the world.
Seeing that Mr Eugene Hung has (very reasonably) drawn comparisons to Poker and Magic-The-Gathering, two other card games that I have spent hundreds of hours on when I wasn't playing bridge, I'd like to share my thoughts about why Bridge is not catching on among youths as much as the other two strategy games.
(And believe me the parallels drawn are valid - John Kranyak and Justin Lall and many others are duo-game pros, so to speak)

1. Popular sports tend to be spectacle sports, and bridge isn't “spectacular”:

Bridge- there aren't dramatic moves that have visual impact, watching Vugraph is not exactly nail-biting, and bridge celebrities don't really have much influence on junior players (I love bridge celebrities, but many of my bridge friends don't know who or what is Meckwell or Blue Team).

Poker- Just search “World Series of Poker <any year>” on Youtube.com to find thousands of very popular coverage videos of Poker championships. The “spectacles” are primarily the grandeur of casinoes as well as the comic sight of huge mountains of colourful chips sliding around the felts, and the live decisions/reactions of players.
Also, poker celebrities are household names for the rest of us non-professional players.

Magic The Gathering- on magicthegathering.com, one can view play-by-play features of past and present matches, stay updated about the results of their favorite celebrity players. Of course it helps that Magic is VERY visually entertaining to juniors, with all the beautifully illustrated fantasy characters…

2. Enthusiasts need help, i cannot emphasize this enough. A junior needs means to improve, e.g coaching or access to instructional materials.
Also, should he/she do well enough to represent his city/state/country, he/she will most likely require some financial support.

Bridge- for youngsters who don't have access to a professional coach, helpful literature is scarce and seldom free.
Worse, even if we overcome that and become the better ones among (the handful of) our city/country's youths, and aim higher, the high cost of overseas travel is always a huge obstacle.
Not to undermine my beloved NBO and their efforts, but sometimes one can only envy those in the youth programs of countries that dominate youth world championships.

Poker (and Magic)- suffice to say that there are many sites/forums each with more columns/threads on intermediate to advanced strategies and techniques than the Bridge equivalents on Bridgewinners.com.
Poker players can win online qualifiers or “satellites” to redeem packages for major tournaments. It is essentially the same for Magic, as players can win Qualifiers held in their own cities and get sponsored for Pro Tours that span the globe.


There are many other factors of course, and they tend to be interrelated or even chicken-egg in nature.
But to wrap up my two main points of comparison…

first- i think Bridge needs “celebrities” (especially pros who are technically juniors) as role models for juniors to look up to, and to promote the game with their youthful charisma and fiery will to win, so perhaps bridge authorities like ACBL/WBF could tape and publish interviews/documentaries/similar of successful young players like Joe Grue, Nabil Edggton, Joshua Donn etc etc who are already quite well known in the established bridge community but not too familiar to the typical college player;

second, provide support to deserving junior teams to advance to the next chapter: be it national, continental, or world championships.

Cheers, and may Bridge attain the popularity levels of those card games that apparently look like Bridge's (superior) substitutes in the youth ‘market’, at least for now.
March 21, 2012
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Adam, i think

1c-1h-1s-2h: your 8-count could bid this
1c-1h-1s-(2c*-2d*)-2H/3H: invites, 5/6+ carder (the brackets highlight the relay sequences in xyz)

And about the 2NT treatment, i think many good players would play puppet to 3C mentioned above by Harald either to play there or unscramble some hands with a fit for partner's 1m and at least mild slam interest. Depending on the partnership, this might be valid only for 1m-1M-1NT sequences (most likely) or all xyz.

1x-1y-1z-(2NT*-3C*)-
Pass: to play in clubs, good 6-carder if 1x is 1D, unbalanced 5carder if 1x is 1C
3D*/H*: 5Y 4X lo/hi splinter in unbid suit
3S*/N*: 4Y 5X lo/hi splinter


March 13, 2012
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Rainer:
i suspect that many good players will indeed lead a diamond.
there are merits and drawbacks of passive/aggressive leads, can't really generalize except evaluate the situation as above mentioned.
of course aggressive leads are more attractive if opps announce strength and one needs partner to have his scarce values in the right place.
Feb. 17, 2012
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