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All comments by Zach Grossack
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I commend the efforts. People should remember these are private, invitational events without sanctions and master points. I think it’s great to have people paying attention and monitoring the game
June 20
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I so agree with Christina. The Open championships is a chance for everyone to compete in the highest form for all categories. I also see no reason why the wbf has any vested interest in skipping these open championships - aren’t they the most attended!? I hope there’s still time to modify this decision.
May 29
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i know im gonna be in the minority but it has to be good odds on pass if I'm not bidding 3NT (looks too slow but second choice for sure)
April 27
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Imo - it’s someone’s decision to not go, and someone’s decision to cancel their hotel room. Expecting the money back when the tournament hasn’t been cancelled seems a bit far.
March 10
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Congrats on a well fought win!
May 29, 2019
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This article panders to the way the public perceives our game. No young or professional person will want to start playing and realize the competitive draw of bridge and its complexity after reading this - older people at a club trying to recruit people to prevent it from dying doesn’t exactly sound like a ringing endorsement. Not trying to offend anyone, but this is not the kind of press bridge needs - IMO the ridiculous coverage of Geir painted bridge as more attractive to millennial and Gen Xers. Much more compelling at least.
Funny how bridge has come to articles like this and chess is still a “mind sport.” The bridge world as a whole needs to address this perception problem; deconstructing the current disparity in narrative between bridge and chess is where I usually start when explaining my profession to my college friends.
April 30, 2019
Zach Grossack edited this comment April 30, 2019
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this is an obvious 6d bid… an ode to a man who believes that 6d always makes
Feb. 15, 2018
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Ok everyone it's now just about Wednesday in most parts of the world, so we would like to thank everyone for their questions and interest today and most of all Bridgewinners for making this all possible! Not only were great questions asked here, but a lot of ideas about the future of our game came to light — both Adam and I are excited about working on some of these ideas and making them reality.
Thanks again everyone!
- A & Z
Oct. 4, 2017
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hey Debbie
The streamliner so to speak! Where players can give their names to one source so the pool is anonymous to the general public, unlike the partnership desk, and people with similar abilities can be matched up with relative ease. Cool idea! I would definitely have interest in making that happen.
Oct. 4, 2017
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@James, i feel like that's the age at which people actually start developing intellectual curiosity instead of just doing something because it's fun or it's what their guardian wants them to do. I could be totally wrong on this as I don't have kids/haven't really worked extensively with them.
Oct. 3, 2017
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Hey Bob,
Thank you for saying that! Here in New England, we pride ourselves on being 5-10 years behind the times when it comes to the bridge world … lol. But really it sort of is why we don't attract the pro teams; the highly competent amateur teams scene we had here wasn't ready for the big time pros and clients to come in. Of course I'm generalizing here, but I think that D25 under Bob Bertoni is making some really good strides with our tournaments and working on increasing attendance and getting non-local teams back in our regionals!

To answer your question, I think pro bridge as we know it now has a good chunk of years left, but I agree that at some point, demand will start decreasing. That's why I don't want to limit my career to just being a bridge professional. Do it while it's good, but always be working on something else or be ready to undertake a new venture. That's my thinking.
Oct. 3, 2017
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Dearest Peg
I was eight years old! Germs were cool!
Oct. 3, 2017
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Hey Liam,
Well, I'm a psych major here at Tufts, and I can tell you that there's a difference between psychology as a science and the type of psychology people are referring to in bridge. When people say psychology is good for bridge, they really are talking about gut-based pseudoscience, aka reads. Very real phenomena, but just thought I would clear that up.

There is certainly an emotional/intangible/people-reading component to bridge that brings it closer to poker and I love that aspect of the game. It can be tough because feeling like everyone's playing some poker with you at high level bridge can lead you to overthink and play a read instead of a percentage. I, for example, often take these positions where I feel like I have a strong read based on mannerisms, intensity, card-play, whatever; I love playing the player. But Meck says “play the cards, not the people.” I'm no Meck, but I think experts can agree/disagree on the importance of playing reads in high level bridge.

Emotional intelligence/control is a whole different ball-game. As my Bro said recently: “there's more to being a good player than playing well” or something along those lines. Getting the most out of your partner, and yourself for that manner, is a vital part of this game. It is in this area that I need the most work to improve.
Oct. 3, 2017
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Hey Yoon,
Thanks man.
Definitely still wanna go places. Never been to south America, anywhere on the british Isles, the Netherlands. Top places would be Northern Europe Metros Like Amsterdam, Stockholm, and Copenhagen. I love Scandinavians, and I just really wanna visit Amsterdam.

Tell Lolo to come up to boston if she wants me to keep my word!
Oct. 3, 2017
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Robb

I'm obviously biased— I wans't alive for those guys. i think I was being more accurate when I said legend of my childhood.

We try to represent our great city with class at all times!
Oct. 3, 2017
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Hi James
So if you look up to Adam parrish's comment, I kinda spilled my thoughts about this idea of a real online way to learn bridge. I have inquiries about actually working on building something like this. I didn't think I would end up involved in starting a real platform at the beginning of the day, but i'm now strongly considering it! I will be writing you in the future if/when the ball starts rolling on this.
Oct. 3, 2017
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Hi Fred,
I appreciate your kind comments! Good luck to you as well.
Oct. 3, 2017
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Hi Yosep,

In truth, I'm not a huge conventions guy. I do play lots of them and it does help when you and your partner can be on the same wavelength and use specific tools for specific hands. BUT, there's something really fun about sitting down with a partner and saying we play standard and playing a set of bridge. Almost forces you to make simple bids, avoiding bidding disasters!

But to answer your question, I really like non-serious 3nt, because it has helped maniacs like me avoid (some) bad slams that otherwise we just couldn't help ourselves but bid.

I also just started playing reverse Good-Bad 2nt (we call it bad-good). In competitive auctions, It helps us differentiate between really good hands, and ones that just want to compete.

http://www.bridgeguys.com/Conventions/good_bad_two_no_trump.html

Read about it there if you want. Just note that Adam and I now play that whole convention reversed, where starting with 2nt shows the strong hand, and bidding is just competitive.
Oct. 3, 2017
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Hi Venky,
Thanks for your comments.
I've always thought standard bridge classes were subpar when it came to actually improving as a bridge player. (Of course, my classes are a different story entirely!! ;))

Wanna get better? Play a crap load, on line, and then in person for the real experience. Look over the hands. Note your mistakes. Note others' mistakes. Maybe someone did something that worked well against you. Note that too. The point is, look for what works, what doesn't, and most importantly, try not to make a similar mistake to one you have already made and learned from. LEARN FROM YOUR MISTAKES.

At the table, try counting out an entire hand; every card in every suit. I like to run backwards from thirteen, discount your own, and then subtract one for every card you see played in that suit. Leave tricks up if you need to pause and take stock. It's doable! It's just harder for some than it is for others, especially cuz there is so much going on in your mind on every given hand. If you are putting in the effort to count on hundreds of hands, it will soon become second nature!
Oct. 3, 2017
Zach Grossack edited this comment Oct. 3, 2017
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Well, I would view it this way:
1s is a lie. It is usually 5+ spades
1nt is a lie. It usually has a club stopper
So Why bid 1nt?
Well, for one thing, no trump might well be your best spot. 1s could give your partner a very tough bid.1nt is also pretty on target with point range (~8+-12-)
At the end of the day, the 1c opener could have worse clubs that you do! So my choice, as a matchpoints hound, is definitely 1nt.
Oct. 3, 2017
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